Hot Trend: Patchwork Tiles


By Marica

One hot hot hot décor trend that we’ve been keeping our eye on for the past year or so is the patterned tile trend. The web is a-wash with images of beautiful contemporary interiors tiled with traditional Moroccan or Mediterranean-style tiles. It started slow – a good thing I think as this trend is so visually stimulating it might take one a while to adjust to its attractive yet imposing busyness.

The trend has gradually migrated from floors to walls which has only made us like it all the more. Using a mix-and-match selection of tiles with different colours and patterns further enhances the playfulness of this trend. The end result is a quirky and eclectic patchwork effect with a slight Bohemian flavour.

This trend is however not for the faint-hearted. Balance is also very important. If you want your patchwork tiles to have maximum appeal it is best to introduce it to a fresh space with an overly white backdrop. The trendy Scandi-type style would be the perfect match.

If you love the idea of having patchwork tiles in your home but don’t feel brave enough to commit to tiling a large area – start small. Apply it as a small backsplash in your guest loo, or intersperse it with plain white tiles for a more reserved style statement.

Need a little patterned tile inspiration? Check out these gorgeous tiled examples…

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For The Love Of Klimt


Just yesterday Marica and I were discussing our love for the art of Gustav Klimt – Austrian symbolist painter. Today, his work is often seen as clichéd and cheesy (same happened to the work of poor Tretchikoff) however here at The Tabloid we still think it grand and romantic! We especially adore Klimt’s “Golden Phase” – many of his paintings from this period include the use of gold leaf – his famous “The Kiss” is an excellent example of this.

During the course of one of our Irish boutique hotel projects in Galway, I met a South African artist who works in a very different art medium. She would paint beautiful scenes on glass, cut the painted glass into puzzle-like pieces, and then tile it back together again in a mosaic-like fashion. The resulting artwork is absolutely stunning!

Through her I was introduced to the art work of Klimt – at the time she was creating some unbelievably beautiful Klimt tribute pieces in her shattered glass method. Well, needless to say I fell in love with his Klimt’s work right there and then. Naturally, we commissioned three big pieces of Klimt’s ladies from our glass artist to proudly display them in the reception area of the hotel.

There were a few unique art pieces in that hotel, but these three gorgeous ladies were the first the guests encountered. I always liked to think they were not only welcoming the guests, but also entertaining them and watching over them.

Now for your enjoyment, I’ve include our favourite works by Klimt below…

Strongwoman does Mandela Day


Google Doodle - Mandela-Day-2014

Mandela Day is here! What will you be doing to celebrate the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela today?

girl power - liesl schoonraad warming upWe will be spending our #67minutes  today supporting one very special lady – strongwoman Liesl Schoonraad.

Liesl will be doing a whopping 67 000 kg worth of calf presses in 67 minutes – a record event! Why would she push her body to lift the equivalent of 10 fully grown African Elephants with her calves? All for charity! You can read more about the challenge: here.

Join us along with event sponsor Xtraordinary Women at Virgin Active Table View today at 14:00 and spend your #67Minutes with us in supporting your local community and a good cause.

We wish Liesl the best of luck in achieving this amazing feat – we are behind you 100% girl!

Hope to see you guys and gals at 2pm!

By the way – did you see the awesome Mandela Day interactive Google doodle today?

Décor Dictionary: Boucherouite


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Boucherouite: (pronounced boo-shay-REET, a word derived from a Moroccan-Arabic phrase for “torn and reused clothing”) is a “rag rug” woven by the nomadic tribes of Morocco including the Berber. In the mid 20th century, Morocco saw some socio-economic change which resulted in a reduction in wool production. It is during this period that tribal weavers started supplementing wool with recycled fabrics, cheap synthetic fibers and even plastics. Boucherouite rugs are easily identifiably by their bold and vibrant colouring and asymmetrical free-form geometric patterns.

[Image Sources: 1, 2, 3]

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