Quick Tip #46: Clothes Hanger Coat Rack

Here is the second to last tip in our Décor Quick Tip mini series about interesting things to do with the humble clothes hanger…

#46  Need some more organisational hanging space? Well, if you have some extra wooden clothes hangers lying around you might want to consider repurposing them into a one-of-a-kind coat rack. The hanger hooks act as a perfect catch for keys and handbags, while the wooden arm of the hanger serves as an excellent peg for coats, scarves and hats. Cut your hangers and attached them to some kind of backing board – be creative with your configuration. Now simply fix your coat rack unto a wall – the entrance foyer or dressing room would be ideal.

See more examples of clothes hanger displays on our “Storage” pinboard on Pinterest: here.


Hier is die tweede laaste slim wenk in ons Décor Quick Tip mini-reeks oor al die interessante dinge wat mens met die nederige klerehanger kan maak…

#46  Soek jy meer hangspasie? Wel, as jy ‘n ektra paar hout klerehangers het wat rondlê kan jy dit in ‘n unieke en ongewone kapstok omskep. Die hanger haak tree op as ‘n perfekte vangs vir sleutels en handsakke, terwyl die hout arm van die hanger dien as ‘n uitstekende pen vir jasse, serpe en hoede. Sny jou hangers en skroef dit vas aan ‘n plank of substraat wat maklik aan die muur geheg kan word. Wees kreatief met jou hanger uitleg. Monteer dan jou kapstok teen ‘n muur – die ingangsportaal of aantrekkamer sal ideaal wees .

Vir meer voorbeelde van klerehanger idees besoek op ons “Storage” pinboard op Pinterest: hier.

Cinder Block Design-Off

Cinder Block Design-Off - SuzelleDIY vs Justina Blakeney

SuzelleDIY Versus Justina Blakeney: a DIY Face-off

A couple of months ago Justina Blakeney uploaded another one of her interesting DIY tutorials that forms part of the Eye on Design series hosted by the popular POPSUGAR Home channel.

While watching the Justina’s video I recalled that SuzelleDIY did a similar DIY last year. In fact, this particular DIY is Suzelle’s most watched video with over two million views. Both videos centre around cement cinder blocks and how you can use them to create quirky outdoor features that will spruce up your garden.

So let’s have a little DIY face-off shall we! Here are both Suzelle and Justina’s cinder block DIYs – you tell me which you prefer….

How to Make a Cinder Block Bench:

Suzelle used her cinder blocks to create an outdoor planter bench. She had the right idea by inviting Marianne to help the bench take shape as those big cement bricks can be quite heavy.

Suzelle taped off sections of each cement brick and applied colourful spray paint to the exposed sections.

Alternating the direction in which the blocks are stacked, Suzelle managed to create not only seating space with flower planters above but also handy little cubby holes to store gardening tools.

It is a good idea to use cement glue to fix the blocks together as Suzelle suggested. The last thing you want is your bench falling apart while someone is sitting on it. #safetyfirst

Lastly, Suzelle planted some happy flowers in the cinder block holes and added seat cushions and quirky scatters to her bench to jazz it up.

How to Make a 80s-Inspired Outdoor Planter:

In Justina’s DIY clip, which took inspiration from the style of the 80s, she creates a stacked cinder block planter.

Like Suzelle, Justina also opted to paint part of her cinder blocks in bright and bold colours. Both ladies chose a triangle shaped design which allows the rough cement texture and colourful paint to form a nice contrasting effect.

It looks like Justina did a proper job. She used three coats of outdoor paint on her bricks which is far brighter and more durable than Suzelle’s quick spray paint job.

Justina also took the time to create wire mesh “baskets” to insert into her cinder block that will ensure that the plants have sufficient support and drainage. However, the process of cutting the wire mesh to size sure seemed tedious and unnecessarily laborious. Can you imagine repeating that process half a dozen times?

What appeals to me about both Suzelle and Justina’s creations is that something as uninspiring as a heap of cinder blocks can be transformed, with minimal effort and money, into a quirky and happy garden feature.

Like Suzelle said: “D.I.Y? Because anybody can make outdoor furniture out with regular ugly (and disgusting) cinder blocks…”

Which is your favourite Cinder Block project? Who wins the DIY challenge, Suzelle or Justina?

Home Must Have: Stunning Velvet Sofas

Want to know what is on this interior designer’s personal home upgrade wish list?

A gorgeous, dramatic velvet sofa.

Preferably in a bold jewel tone colour – like a striking teal, emerald or amethyst pink.

I swoon every time a scroll through my Pinterest feed and spot another beautiful brightly-hued velvet sofa. There is just something so beautifully decadent about a velvet sofa – it’s almost theatrical. It is probably because velvet is synonymous with luxury and opulence. Rose recently sourced a stunning sapphire blue velvet sofa for a client of ours. I cannot even begin to describe to you how amazing it looked.

Maybe it is the colder months or the fact that velvet is so amazingly tactile that is driving my velvet sofa desire. I just want to curl up on one with a good book and a throw. Or maybe stroke it ever so gently… I promise I’m not weird.

Until a few years ago velvet was used quite sparingly as it had a reputation of being somewhat “gauche”. I mean, I’m sure we all had a grandma or great aunt with a ratty velvet sofa in her lounge.  Now velvet is experiencing a trendy revival… and I would give my right arm for my Gran’s ratty vintage velvet sofa.

Although velvet looks smashing on any style of sofa, I think there is something extra dramatic and seductive about a velvet sofa in a slightly more classical / traditional style. Take a Chesterfield or English Roll-Arm sofa for instance – it is as if it was made to be decked out in plush velvet. Maybe it is all the curves and deep-buttoning.

I did a quick online search to see what is available locally and was quite disappointed with the selection. I guess if I ever want to get a velvet sofa for my living room I would have to have it custom made trough on of Design Monarchy’s trusty suppliers.

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Swedish Elle blogger Elsa Billgren shared a couple of snaps of her Stockholm apartment. The crowning jewel of the living room would have to be this gorgeous green velvet sofa. The sofa from Ikea is appropriately called the “Stockholm” sofa and its slight Mid-Century Modern lines works perfectly in Elsa’s Scandi styled flat.  |  Photo: Beata Holmgren

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Interior designer Harriet Anstruther made sure to add some punch to her bright 1840’s London town house with this bold pink velvet sofa. The use of black and white makes for a dramatic colour combination.  |  Photo: Paul Raeside via housetohome

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Oh my, how I love stylist Emily Henderson‘s use of colour! Here, in the studio of Joy Cho of Oh Joy!, she had a quirky little retro sofa upholstered in a beautiful emerald velvet and paired it with hot pink velvet easy chairs. Do yourself a favour and pop over to Emily’s blog to see the rest of Joy’s studio – it is SERIOUSLY envy-worthy!  |  Photo: Zeke Ruelas

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I cannot tell you how much I love this bold red deep-buttoned velvet sofa in the pink-walled living room of New York interior designer, Miles Redd. Miles, who is known for his quirky brand of cosy glamour used to be the creative director of Oscar de la Renta Home.

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Love the touches of yellow New York interior design firm, Tilton Fenwick, used to complement this blue velvet deep-buttoned (or “tuffed” as the Yanks call it) sofa in this Greenwich Village Loft. | Photo: Trevor Tondro

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Another Mid-century Modern inspired velvet sofa, this one from Urban Outfitters. What would you call this colour? Chartreuse? BTW – can you believe this one is a sleeper couch?

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What an absolute statement this mustard-coloured velvet English Roll-Arm sofa by Rose & Grey makes! And it looks SO comfy too!

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This velvet sofa might actually be my favourite – a striking deep-buttoned Chesterfield style sofa with slightly sloped rolled arms – in a delicious deep purple of course! It is called the “Darcy” sofa from UK furniture manufactures, Arlo & Jacob.  |  Photo via Dear Designer

What do you think about these gorgeous velvet sofas? Are you going to add a velvet sofa to your home “must-have” list like I did? 

Decorating Dictionary: Verdigris

Verdigris: is a bright blue-green patina, or natural “coating”, that is formed when copper, bronze or brass is exposed to air or seawater over a period of time. The Statue of Liberty is an excellent example of this. The term is a variation on the Old French “vert-de-Grèce”, meaning “green of Greece”; however the contemporary French spelling “vert-de-gris” translates to “green of grey”. Until the 19th century Verdigris was also a sought after green colour pigment often used in paintings.

[Image Sources: 1, 2]

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