Décor Dictionary: Beni Ourain Rug

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Beni Ourain Rug: is a plush shaggy pile rug hand-woven from Berber wool by the nomadic Beni Ourain tribe of the Moroccan Atlas Mountains.  The rugs, which traditionally were used as bedding rather than carpets, are easily recognizable by its ivory background and simple dark geometric patterns (frequently featuring diamond shapes). Beni Ourain rugs were a popular choice in the early 20th century – often favoured by the Modern masters such as Le Corbusier, Charles & Ray Eames and Alvar Alto.

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Décor Dictionary: Boucherouite

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Boucherouite: (pronounced boo-shay-REET, a word derived from a Moroccan-Arabic phrase for “torn and reused clothing”) is a “rag rug” woven by the nomadic tribes of Morocco including the Berber. In the mid 20th century, Morocco saw some socio-economic change which resulted in a reduction in wool production. It is during this period that tribal weavers started supplementing wool with recycled fabrics, cheap synthetic fibres and even plastics. Boucherouite rugs are easily identifiable by their bold and vibrant colouring and asymmetrical free-form geometric patterns.

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Décor Dictionary: Dhurrie

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Dhurrie: a flat-woven rug traditionally made from cotton or wool and indigenous to India and its surrounding regions. Woven on horizontal looms, Dhurries have a tight weave with no pile, making them hard-wearing and reversible. With its diversity in patterns (traditionally designs include geometrics, stripes & plains) and wide variety of colours, Dhurries makes for versatile and desirable rugs.

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Décor Dictionary: Kilim

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Kilim: (from the Persian “gelīm” meaning “to spread roughly”) is a pileless hand-woven textile made in Turkey, the Balkans, the Caucasus, Iran, Pakistan and various parts of the Middle East. Kilims traditionally feature predominantly geometric patterns and symbolic motifs in rich brilliant colours. It is most often associated with rugs; however the tapestry-like textile is also frequently used as wall-hangings and upholstery. 

Check out this awesome article on the “language” (i.e. its patterns and symbolism) of Kilims: here.

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