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Decorating Dictionary: Matelassé

Matelassé: (pronounced: mat-la-SAY) is a weaving or stitching method yielding a fabric that appears quilted or padded. This effect can be achieved by hand, jacquard loom, or quilting machine. The fabric is meant to imitate the style of hand-stitched quilts made in Marseilles, France. Matelassé fabric is often used to make bedding.

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Skinny laMinx

Heather Moore of surface & textile design company Skinny laMinx chatted to Afrikaans morning show, Dagbreek, last week. Check it this cute little clip where she shares some of the Skinny laMinx story.

BTW – CityMob is having a Skinny laMinx 12-day flash sale. You can buy some awesome Skinny scatter cushions at an absolute steal… it’s selling like hotcakes! See the sale: here.

Décor Dictionary: Moire

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Moire: is a fabric with a wavy, rippled appearance traditionally produced mainly from silk however wool, cotton and rayon can also be used. The most common technique for making moire fabric is calendering, where the material is folded, moistened and passed under ribbed rollers at high temperatures and pressures. This watered effect can also be imitated using either weaves or colour printing methods but will lack the shine and dimension of true moire. Interestingly, the term moire is used to describe the cloth and moiré the pattern.

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Li Edelkoort Talks Textiles

“In these almost impossible to live in times,” says Edelkoort with feeling, “we need to be cuddled.” As a trend forecaster, she believes that in the near future we will see the overwhelming revival of textiles in our interiors, and that we will literally crave their tactility, sense of narration and colour.  “The only problem, she points out, is that we are closing our mills at a rate of knots, and universities are fast replacing looms with computers. The result? We are slowly forgetting how fabrics are made and where they come from. Yet, the appeal of textiles is universal and timeless,” says Edelkoort, “making them also very sustainable.”

The future, she says, “will see the overwhelming revival of textiles in our interiors, covering floors, walls and furniture in an expansive and personal manner. These textiles will speak loud and clear, and become the fabrics of life, narrating stories, designing patterns, promoting well-being and reviving the act of creative weaving.”

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