Décor Dictionary: Refectory Table

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Refectory Table: a very long and narrow table with trestle-like legs which are joined by a low-slung stretcher. It was originally used as dining tables in the refectory, or rather dining hall, of monasteries during the medieval era. Secular use of the table spread to the Mediterranean and the rest of Europe during the late 16th century.

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Décor Dictionary: Selvedge  Décor Dictionary: Toile de Jouy  Décor Dictionary: Wingback Chair

Décor Dictionary: Selvedge

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Selvedge: or “selvage” (US English) is a narrow border or self-finished edge on either side of a woven fabric. This prevents the fabric from unravelling or fraying. The term is a corruption of “self-edge”. The selvedge often contains the manufacturer’s mark, designer name, and other relevant information like pattern repeat and colour scheme. Fabric near the selvage is frequently discarded as it may have a different weave pattern or thickness.

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Décor Dictionary: Toile de Jouy  Décor Dictionary: Wingback Chair  Décor Dictionary: Faux

Décor Dictionary: Faux

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Faux: (French for “false”) a term used to describe objects, materials or finishes which are made to imitate or resemble the genuine article. Faux products can include embossed vinyl made to look like leather, synthetic fur, man-made stone, vinyl or printed wood flooring and decorative paint techniques that replicate the appearance of materials such as marble, wood or stone.

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Décor Dictionary: Wingback Chair

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Wingback Chair: is an upholstered high-back armchair with angled upholstered panels or “wings” attached to the back that curve down to join the arms. Originally, the wings were designed to protect the sitter from drafts. There are many wing “styles” – the most typical being the flat-wing and the scroll-wing. Other more flamboyant adaptations include the bat-wing and butterfly-wing chairs – and that is just naming a few.

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Décor Dictionary: Toile de Jouy

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Toile de Jouy: (often simply referred to as “toile”) is a repeated single-coloured pattern depicting intricate scenes, usually of a pastoral theme (such as a couple having a picnic by a lake). Other Toile imagery include arrangements of flowers and fruit, country or farming landscapes and mythological and period-specific figures. The term derives from French – “Toile” meaning cloth, while “Jouy” refers to the French town Jouy-en-Josas, near Versailles. 

Pssst, wanna know more about Toile? Read this very interesting and informative article: James Russell on the History of Toile de Jouy

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