Bold & Bright Interiors | via thedesigntabloid.com

The Flip Side: Bold & Bright Interiors

by Rose McClement

Marica recently wrote a Trend Alert article, highlighting some of the gorgeous dark and moody interiors. Prominent in all of these moody interiors were the wonderfully exhilarating deep and darker tones of some jewel colours. Colours such as Royal Blue, Emerald Green, Teal Green, Plum, Grape, Yellow, Bold Pink, Dark Grey, Orange and Lime Green.

While reading that article, I seeped into those alluring interior images. My heart was pounding with absolute pleasure at the beauty of those interiors. Definitely my kinda thing in a big way!

Bold & Bright Interiors | via thedesigntabloid.com
source: bien fait via instagram

My friend Stella, a loyal member of our Facebook Fan Club made a very interesting comment on the post.

This is what she said: I sooooo appreciate viewing these dark & moody tones. But for me it’s largely seasonal.  As you say, winter draws one in. It’s cosy, gorgeous but come summer I want to bask in LIGHT, white and bright.  So could I live with the dark tones? I don’t think so… but an accent wall, now you’re talking.  (All emphasis hers, including the numbers of “oooo’s” in the word “soooo”)

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Trend Alert: Bold & Moody Interiors | via thedesigntabloid.com

Trend Alert: Bold & Moody Interiors

by Marica Fick

You don’t have to pour over every single one of our blog posts to know that Marica loves loads of colour in a bright, white space. The white-on-white interior trend, inspired by those lovely bright Scandinavian spaces, has long been an industry darling. While a white backdrop will always be a popular go-to choice, the past year we have seen the winds changing.

People are starting to yearn for something a bit more substantial … darker, moody. If there was one home trend that seemed to eclipse the others this past year, it was the gradual shift towards dark and rich tones.

Trend Alert: Bold & Moody Interiors | via thedesigntabloid.com
source: Adore Magazine

Even I, lover of white, have succumbed to the inky siren’s call. Maybe it is the approaching cold of winter that has me longing for a dark and cosy nest.

I think, however, the element that finally convinced me to move to the “dark side” was the deep jewel tones often paired with these inky interiors. The only thing I love more than a white backdrop is an array of bold jewel colours.

In fact, that is one thing that most trend predictors agreed on last year – the insurgence of vibrant jewel tones. The beauty of these gemstone colours is that they are bold, loud and impossible to ignore in a room. It instantly fills the room in with warmth and drama.Read More »

Pantone Colour of 2018: ULTRA VIOLET

by Marica Fick

Happy 2018 everyone! I hope you all had a brilliant and rest-filled festive break?

I’m sure by now you have all noticed a certain colour trend flooding image-sharing websites and blogs? You know the colour I’m referring to – it is a bold and dramatic shade of purple with a slightly bluer undertone – an almost “Royal Purple“.  Anyhoo, however you choose to describe it, it is called Ultra Violet and it is Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2018.

Pantone Ultra Violet
Source

Purple tends to be a colour that people either love or hate. It is often viewed as a transcendental colour – it symbolizes spirituality, the sub-conscious, creativity, and royalty. Purple is also associated with decadence and conceit and, in some countries, it is the colour of mourning.

Design Monarchy is no stranger to using purple in our interior design projects – we LOVE bold. In fact, when Pantone announced their new Colour of the Year last December, I immediately thought of two specific projects – Summerley Court and The Manor – both upmarket retirement/hospitality venues. While the purples used in the aforementioned projects were not the exact tone and shade of Ultra Violet, it serves as an excellent example of the power and popularity of purple.

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trend alert: blush

Trend Alert: Beautiful Blush Pink

By Marica

If you have been watching your Pinterest and Instagram feeds I’m sure you would have noticed a strong influx of soft and gentle pinks. And, just to be clear, when we say “pink” we are not speaking of a candy-coloured baby pink or a bold fuchsia. Oh no, we mean gorgeous shades of blushdelicate and warm with an almost “skin” like or “nude” undertone. So subtle a colour it is almost bordering on a neutral.

I have to admit this trend alert comes to you a little belatedly. However, Rose and I are so taken with this colour that we could not let the opportunity pass to share it with you. I suppose one thing that works in our favour is that trends take so long to reach retail level – it seems once the general public notices a trend and sees it on the shop shelves, it is almost old news online.

This gorgeous colour trend is another gifted to us by the fashion industry – think pretty barely-there pink lips, flowing and soft dusty rose fabrics, and stunning nude pink leathers and shoes.

Furthermore, it is not surprising that blush coloured interiors are all the rage as such a pink was Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2016. The lovely pink, called “Rose Quartz”, actually formed part of a colour duo, a first for Pantone. It was paired with “Serenity” – a soft blue.

Blush, while understated, can be quite chic and sophisticated. Even though the colour is soft and strikingly feminine, it is not necessarily fluffy or overly “girly”. Because of its dusty muted undertones Blush can easily be incorporated into a more masculine or gender-neutral interior.

In colour psychology Blush pink signifies tenderness, tranquillity and a nurturing strength. When introduce into one’s interior it can have a very enveloping womb-like and calming effect. It is therefore an excellent choice for spaces such as bedrooms and bathrooms or any other areas where you seek comfort and relaxation.

Because of its warm almost-neutral quality, Blush pink falls more into the Winter colour sphere than that of Spring. It works well with greys, whites, and other muted pastel shades like pale sage greens. This rosy colour also looks beautiful when combined with lighter Scandinavian woods and warm metals like copper or rose gold.

If you are afraid of creating an excessively feminine space, use a more neutral colour as a base and only incorporate Blush as an accent by way of your decorative accessories.

source: Pompeli

source: Shauntelle Sposto

source: Junebug Weddings  |  photo: Kreativ Wedding

source: Rått & Sanselig  |  photo: Birgit Fausk

source: Rått & Sanselig  |  photo: Birgit Fausk

source: Ikea  |  photo: Sara Danielsson

source: Suite One Studio

source: vtwonen  |  photo: Alexander van Berge

source:  stadshem via gravity home

10 Painted Ceilings That Pop

Are you in the mood to do something a little unusual with your space… a bit daring even?  Here is an atypical home trend you might want to try: painted ceilings. And no, I definitely DO NOT mean white – or off-white for that matter! I’m talking bold, bright, unapologetic colour!

Think about it. We decorate and colour-in our floors, walls and everything else, yet our ceilings remain a large unused stretch of open real-estate. Consider it as a fifth wall – another blank canvas to be painted.

Painted Ceilings (3)

Image Source: Justina Blakeney

Painting the Fifth Wall:

While a white-painted ceiling is the traditional and safe choice, it is also predictable and boring. It has been the norm for far too long! Giving your ceiling a fresh lick of paint is an unexpected and playful approach to add colour and interest to your interior without overwhelming the space.

It is said that a white ceiling appears higher and brighter, while a coloured ceiling appears lower. However, if the colour and application thereof is chosen with care it can actually make your ceiling look higher. It is therefore important to select the right colour and shade that will best suit en compliment your space.

Bright Painted Ceiling

Image Source: Magnus Anesund

Things to Keep in Mind When Painting Your Ceiling:

⊗  Height:  If you are brave enough to opt for a very bright or dark painted ceiling, you have to ensure that you have the appropriate ceiling height. The last thing you want is to feel claustrophobic. The ceiling should preferably be 2.7m or higher if you want to prevent the room from feeling like it is closing in on you.

⊗  Colour Balance:  If you choose to paint your ceiling in a coloured tone or darker shade, consider keeping your walls light or neutral to avoid colour overload. Light will cause the colour on your ceiling to reflect and bounce unto your walls. So, ideally one should pair a painted ceiling with white to create a beautiful contrast and a pleasing balance.

  Light:  Make sure your space has an abundance of natural light. Painting the ceiling of a dark room with little natural light will make it look like a cave.

Painted Ceilings (6)

Image Source: 47ParkAvenue

Different Painted Ceiling Configurations to Try:

⊗  The “Broad Brush”:  Walls and ceilings are painted the exact same colour. This seamless effect, where walls flow directly into ceiling without interruption, creates a sense of completion and a feeling that you are enveloped by colour. This works best with lighter shades and gentle hues.

⊗  The “One-Shade Darker”:  The ceiling is painted the same colour as the walls but one or two tones darker. This effect gives your room an almost ombré, paint chip / deck effect. Use light to light-medium tones.

⊗  The “Kickstand”:  The ceiling and a single wall is painted the same colour. This effect elevates the walls and ceiling by drawing the eye up the painted wall towards the ceiling. Here you can attempt a brighter colour for a playful and unusual room feature.

⊗  The “Ceiling with a Skirt”:  The ceiling and cornice is painted in the same colour. You can also extend the paint effect further downwards to create a broad skirt or band of colour all around the walls of your room. This effect adds a sense of snug intimacy and cosiness.

⊗  The “Contrast”:  The ceiling is painted in a bright or vivid pop of colour paired with white walls and mouldings to create a bold contrast.  Be warned – this option is not for the faint of heart.

10 Colourful Spaces That Will Make You Want To Paint Your Ceiling:

Painted Ceilings (4)

Image Source: Apartment Therapy

Painted Ceilings (1)

Image Source: BHG

Painted Ceilings (2)

Image Source: Lonny

Painted Ceilings (10)

Image Source: Design Sponge

Painted Ceilings (8)

Image Source: Coco Kelley

Painted Ceilings (7)

Image Source: Hus & Hem

Painted Ceilings (5)

Image Source: SG Style

Pantone Colour of 2015: MARSALA

I’m sure by now you have all spotted a certain colour trend featured heavily on all image-sharing websites. You know the colour I’m referring to – it is sort of a dusty red-ish brown-ish colour… Or is it more like a dull cranberry? Maybe it’s pink-ish paprika? Anyhoo, however you choose to describe it, it is called Marsala and it is Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2015.

Named after the Italian wine, the colour Marsala is said to be both elegant and earthy. While it took me some time to warm to it, I have seen some beautiful applications. Sleek Hollywood leading ladies walking the red carpet draped in gorgeous Marsala-coloured silks and a plush Marsala-hued velvet sofa – very dramatic.

Here is what Pantone had to say about their choice:

“Much like the fortified wine that gives Marsala its name, this tasteful hue embodies the satisfying richness of a fulfilling meal while its grounding red-brown roots emanate a sophisticated, natural earthiness. This hearty, yet stylish tone is universally appealing and translates easily to fashion, beauty, industrial design, home furnishings and interiors.”

“Whether in a flat or textured material, or with a matte or gloss finish, this highly varietal shade combines dramatically with neutrals, including warmer taupes and grays. Because of its burnished undertones, sultry Marsala is highly compatible with amber, umber and golden yellows, greens in both turquoise and teal, and blues in the more vibrant range.”

And of course we can’t sign off without showing you some Marsala-inspired interiors and décor! Please click on the images below to enlarge and view sources…

So what do you think of the Colour of the Year? Yay or Nay?