Blog Archives

Pencil Shavings to Paper Flowers

Paper Flowers by Haruka Misawa

About a week or so ago, while browsing through VISI Magazine‘s weekly newsletter, I came across the amazing, unusual work of Haruka Misawa. The little floral images were eye catching, but were it not for the fact that I stopped to read what he said, I don’t think I might have been as awe struck by his work as I am.

This is what stopped me in my tracks: “Sharpening my pencil, the pencil shavings presenting an arrestingly beautiful form. Curled up in a ring-shaped crown, they looked like the petals of a flower. This kind of personal experience becomes the source of my ideas,” he explains.

Paper Flowers by Haruka Misawa

The Mind of an Artist:

That then is the musings and working of an artistic mind. A mind that goes where mine would not even begin to think of going. He looked down at regular shavings coming out of pencils beings sharpened, and he saw a form of floral art to be explored. WOW!! I wondered at that moment if  I would have seen the potential of a floral art form in mere pencil shavings? I think not. In fact, I know not.

It is for this reason that we are sharing this “different type of art” with you today.

Paper Flowers by Haruka Misawa

Pencil Shavings to Paper Flowers:

Haruka, taking inspiration from his pencil shavings, decided to recreate the same effect but with paper. He used many layers of paper, some graduating in colour, to created a tight cylindrical roll of multicoloured paper – a “paper pencil” so to speak. He then sharpened the paper cylinder with an ordinary pencil sharpener just as one would a normal pencil. The resulting shavings transforms into a beautiful and delicate paper flower, no more than 15mm to 40mm in diameter. On closer inspection one can clearly see the various coloured paper layers.

“Depending on how you sharpen it, the shavings may be thick and heavy, or so thin as to be almost transparent, so you can’t make the same flower twice,” Haruka explains. “Each Paper Flower will bloom quietly and softly on your desk.”

Paper Flowers by Haruka Misawa

Paper Flowers by Haruka Misawa

[Images via Haruka Misawa]

Quick Tip #45: Clothes Hanger Art Display

Here is the third clever tip in our Décor Quick Tip mini series about interesting things to do with the humble clothes hanger…

#45  For an unusual, playful yet practical way of displaying your art, use wooden clothes or trouser hangers as an alternative to framing. Tired of your current art display? For an instant wall refresh, just unclip the old prints and swap them out for new images. No time and money wasted on framing and reframing. This is an especially handy method to exhibit your children’s artwork.

See more examples of clothes hanger displays on our “Storage” pinboard on Pinterest: here.


Hier is die derde slim wenk in ons Décor Quick Tip mini-reeks oor al die interessante dinge wat mens met die nederige klerehanger kan maak…

#45  Is jy op soek na ‘n ongewone, speelse, tog praktiese manier om jou kunswerke te vertoon? Gebruik hout klere- of broekhangers; dit is ‘n wonderlike alternatief as jy nie jou kuns wil laat raam nie. Moeg vir die kunsversameling wat huidig op jou muur is? Verfris dit in ‘n oogwink – ruil net die ou kunswerke op die hangers met nuwe stukke. Hierdie is ook besonderse gerieflike manier om jou kind se talle kunswerke uit te stal.

Vir meer voorbeelde van klerehanger idees besoek op ons “Storage” pinboard op Pinterest: hier.

Décor Dictionary: Triptych

{click to enlarge}

Triptych: (pronounced “triptik”, from the Greek meaning “three-fold”) an artwork consisting of three panels – a typically larger middle panel, flanked by two smaller related works. There are however triptychs of equal-sized panels. Historically, triptych panels were hinged in order for the work to be folded for easy transport. A triptych may consist of three separate images of the same theme, or may be one larger work split into three.

[Images: Source]

Art Crush: Sarah Danes Jarrett

Whilst in Hout Bay last week for a meeting I spotted the most beautiful and captivating artwork in the Hout Bay Gallery window. I was absolutely spellbound by the dramatic faces staring back at me. The portraits, painted by artist Sarah Danes Jarrett, has an almost “fashion glamour shots meets fine art” feel – very sexy. Don’t you just adore the bold use of colour and choppy brushwork?! Love these – a definite art crush!

Images: Hout Bay Gallery

%d bloggers like this: