8 Contemporary Storage Cabinets | via The Design Tabloid

8 Contemporary Storage Cabinets for Your Home

feature image: bo bedre

by Marica Fick

Rose recently spotted a lovely article on Emily Henderson’s blog that set the inspiration cogs in our heads turning. In the post, “Why You Should Be Using Armoires in Every Room”, Emily elaborates why furniture pieces like armoires should not be hidden in the bedroom but incorporated as feature pieces in the rest of the home.

Before we get all tripped up over terminology, let’s quickly look at the definition of “Armoire”

As we have previously defined in our Decorating Dictionary, an Armoire is a large loose-standing two-door cabinet, usually containing shelves, hanging space, and sometimes drawers below. Generally used for storing clothing or household items, interestingly enough it was originally used for storing arms.

8 Contemporary Storage Cabinets | via The Design Tabloid
IKEA’s black-painted BJÖRKSNÄS Display Cabinet serves as a sleek and stylish office storage unit in this home workspace. The design has its roots in Scandinavian handicraft tradition – durable natural materials with fine joinery details and proportions that make suitable for any room of function. | source: IKEA
8 Contemporary Storage Cabinets | via The Design Tabloid
The interiors of this classic Victorian mansion has been impeccably modernised for contemporary family living. What a statement this bold and contemporary armoire makes in one of the bedrooms – and the striking deep blue colour is to die for. | source: est living | interiors: Clare Cousins | photography: Shannon McGrath

Emily had the following to say about this atypical trend:

Let’s talk wardrobes, or armoires if you’re feeling fancy, and how to bring it into our modern day lives because even though likely none of us are currently living in a sprawling French chateau, these heavier pieces of furniture can be used successfully (and VERY chicly) in nearly every room of the house. It’s one of those pieces that are often overlooked, but let’s all agree to stop that right now and consider the armoire.

Sure, with a name like “wardrobe,” you’re thinking they have to be relegated behind closed bedroom doors. But we’re all for thinking outside the box around here at EHD and like to be trailblazers in anything if we can. We’re not in this instance, but we’re loving what we’re seeing from other like-minded people. Because really, armoires are essentially just cabinets for storing things so why can’t we use one anywhere and everywhere we need storage, right? Plus, because they take up more vertical space than horizontal, they’re great for smaller footprints.”

In her blog post, Emily shared some gorgeous examples of both traditional and contemporary armoires used as storage and display in various unexpected parts of the home – from the bathroom and entryway to the dining room and living room.

Read More »

Advertisements
Decorating Quick Tip - Armoire Turned Home Bar | via thedesigntabloid.com

Quick Tip #28: Armoire Turned Home Bar

{click to enlarge}

I absolutely love this idea… a “barmoire” as Martha Stewart calls it.

#28  Transform an old armoire into a sophisticated home bar. With a few minor tweaks, your unwanted armoire can easily be converted from clothes closet to a stylish cabinet to store your alcoholic beverages, decanters and glasses. Your new armoire bar will make for a stunning statement piece that can harmonize effortlessly with existing décor whilst the doors will allow you to keep the bar hidden until happy hour…

[Image sources: 12 & 3]

Décor Dictionary: Armoire

What is the definition of Armoire?

Have you ever heard someone mention the term Armoire and wondered what on earth it meant? Well, now you have to wonder no longer – we will define Armoire for you! Here is the latest addition to our Decorating Dictionary

Armoire: is the French term for a large loose-standing two-door cabinet, usually containing shelves, hanging space, and sometimes drawers below. Generally used for storing clothing or household items, interestingly enough it was originally used for storing arms. Made popular in the late 17th century by Louis XIV, the period pieces are often extremely ornate and imposing whereas contemporary armoires are less ostentatious.

[Image sources: 1, 2]